What To See In September

A tall yellow sunflower can be found in the Stable Yard at Burton Manor. This is probably the perennial species known as Helianthus decapetalus

A tall yellow sunflower can be found in the Stable Yard at Burton Manor. This is probably the perennial species known as Helianthus decapetalus (Photo credit: Peter Cunnington)

Cafe Courtyard

In the tub to your right as you enter is a fine example of the purple-leafed New Zealand Flax, Phormium tenax ‘Purpureum’, its leaf fibres used by New Zealanders for making ropes and twines.

The North Garden

Water Lilies will continue their display until the weather gets colder towards the end of the month. Reed Mace, often referred to as Bullrush, is displaying its chocolate-coloured seed heads and in the opposite corner, purple Lobelia syphilitica makes a muted contribution. Leaves from this plant were made into an infusion by Native Americans to treat sexually transmitted diseases.

Stable Yard

A yellow-flowered rose against the wall and a low Persicaria from the Himalaya contribute colour to this recent development, as does a tall, yellow sunflower. This is a perennial species probably Helianthus decapetalus.

Walled Garden

Walk into the garden past a bed of Mexican, annual Zinnia ‘Faberge’, in dazzling shades of pink and red and yellow.

Vegetable Garden – Broad Beans and peas have completed their cycle to be replaced by Runner Beans, Courgettes and Sweet Corn, the latter, often planted in blocks to ensure good cob production as the tassel-like male flowers above drop pollen onto the developing female cobs below.

Fruit Garden – Autumn fruiting Raspberries are cropping well this year and these, along with other fruit and vegetables, may be purchased when available.

Flower garden – A blaze of colour still greets those who move beyond the vegetables and close inspection will reveal a wealth of traditional herbaceous varieties

Zinnia ‘Faberge’ in the walled garden at Burton Manor

Zinnia ‘Faberge’ in the walled garden at Burton Manor (Photo credit: Peter Cunnington)

Leave the Garden by the Arched Gateway

Go over the drive and follow the path into the Sunken Garden to leave by the sandstone portico, between pink, blue and white Hydrangeas, then turn right towards the Manor with its walls covered in creeper now showing promise of autumn colour. Below the walls are the silver leaves of Senecio cineraria whose yellow daisy flowers possess no real merit. The white flowers of evergreen Eucryphia x nymansensis are holding well this year and will extend into the early part of this month.

Orchard

Some of the old trees are carrying a good crop and these form the basis of the Apple collection recently added to by young trees of Cheshire varieties.