What To See In August

Hydrangeas leading up the steps to the entrance of the sunken garden. The pseudo-classical style gateway is seen in the background.

Hydrangeas leading up the steps to the entrance of the sunken garden. The pseudo-classical style gateway is seen in the background. (Photo credit: Peter Cunnington)

 

The North Garden

Water Lilies continue their display and the expanding leaves shade the surface keeping algal growth to a minimum. At the foot of the steps leading down to the Manor’s front door, scrambling stems of the everlasting sweet pea are now bearing flowers in shades of pink.

Stable Yard

The white Shasta Daisy, Leucanthemum x superbum, maintains its flowering quality and nearby are the chrome yellow flowers of a prostrate, fleshy-leaved sedum suited to the dry conditions found here. A pink-flowered Hebe from New Zealand and a low Persicaria from the Himalaya contribute colour to these beds.

Walled Garden

Pass into the garden past beds of brightly coloured flowers planted for those with a visual handicap.

Vegetable Garden – This year’s harvest is well under way with crops of Broad Beans, Peas and Courgette being gathered on a regular basis. Brassicas are protected under netting to prevent attack from the larval ( caterpillar ) stage of the Cabbage White butterflies. In one of the raised beds carrots may avoid damage from Carrot Root Fly which does not get above a foot or so in altitude when laying its eggs.

Fruit Garden – Much of the soft fruit, Raspberries and Strawberries, is finished and the Bush Fruits are now bearing a good crop

Flower garden – A blaze of colour greets those who move beyond the vegetables and close inspection will reveal a wealth of traditional herbaceous varieties

Leave the Garden by the Arched Gateway

Go over the drive and follow the path into the Sunken Garden. Below the walls misty white flowers on Masterwort may be seen, a plant in the carrot family. Apiacaeae. Leaving here by the sandstone portico, between banks of pink, blue and white Hydrangeas, turn right towards the Manor where Acanthus mollis, known as Bears’ Breeches ( does anyone know why? ) raises its two metre high bracted inflorescences. The shape of the leaves was used extensively to decorate buildings in Greek and Roman architecture.

Bright red flowers on Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ create a striking contrast to white Agapanthus from South Africa. Towards the end of the month beyond the Croquet Lawn, single, white flowers bedeck the tall, evergreen Eucryphya x nymansenis ‘Nymansay’ one of the best plants in the region for late summer colour.